Trudy Lynn

Trudy Lynn
Royal Oaks Blues Café

Connor Ray Music, 2013

By Lady K.
July 2014

Out of Houston, Texas, Trudy Lynn, with Royal Oaks Blues Café, has re-birthed a whole bunch of good old blues music. The promo sheet that accompanied this CD, says the 11 tracks are from the 1920s and ‘30s (!!), which would make it pretty special, BUT, the CD liner notes indicate that 2 tracks were written by Trudy Lynn, making it even more special. Her tunes blend perfectly with the historic cuts. And, Trudy Lynn’s cover photo is perfect for the tunes on the CD. She is the epitome of ‘20s and ‘30s blues singers, with her finger-waved hair, elbow length fur-trimmed gloves, and big bracelets and rings.

The players include: Trudy Lynn (lead vocals); harp (Steve Krase); guitar (John del Toro Richardson); bass (Eugene ‘Spare Time’ Murray; Rock Romano); piano (Randy Wall, Robert ‘Pee Wee’ Stephens); drums (Carl Owens; Richard Cholakian); back vocals provided by Rock Romano, Steve Krase,, and Robert ‘Pee Wee’ Stephens. Lynn’s from-the-gut vocals, along with Steve Krase’s harp are an unforgettable duo throughout the album.

Tony Lynn’s own “Every Side of Lonesome” is up-tempo, and contains some very modern-sounding rockin’ guitar, and she’s missing her man: ‘Please tell my poppa come back home / I been on every side of lonesome since he walked out on me.’ The second track attributed to Ms. Lynn is the uptempo “Down in Memphis”, praising the rockin’ blues experience in Memphis, Tennessee (somewhere on Beale Street, no doubt): ‘there’s a 4-piece band, a man at the door, a line outside waitin’ to get in / People want to hear the blues again’. Yeah, they do!!!

The mid-tempo “Confessin’ the Blues” (J. McShan), with its hot harmonica, is a duet between Trudy Lynn and Krase – a fun duet. The lyrics make her point: ‘Hey baby, will you make everything alright? / Hey baby, don’t you want a girl like me? / If I don’t have you baby, I just swear I hope to die.’ D. Robey’s “Play the Honky Tonks” showcases honky-tonk piano, and her desire to sing – anywhere: ‘Gonna play the high class joints, gonna play the low-class joints, gonna even play the honky-tonks.’

“Feel It”, by B. Campbell, is rockin’, swingin’ blues at its best. ‘Daddy can you feel it? / Can you tell me, Daddy, if your heart beats the same as mine?’ Evidently the writer of “Country Man Blues” is unknown (but definitely a woman). SHE wrote: ‘He can use a plow and milk a cow / When it comes to lovin’ he really knows how / No big-city man for me.’

“Street Walkin’ Daddy”, by G. Day and M. Day, is slow blues, sad blues: ‘Street Walkin’ Daddy tell me what’s on your mind / Tell me baby why you treat me so unkind / Now you want to run around.’ The long instrumental section is a killer. Track 8, “I’m Gonna Put You Down” (W. Booze), she explains that she’s outta there, she’s found someone better: ‘Got me a man, long and tall, when he gets his pay, he say mama take it all’.

“Red Light”, by V. Green, is an up-tempo number with killer harp blues, and lists the contributions of well-known heroes – Columbus, King Arthur, among others. Another ‘hero’ recounted in song is Eloise Bennett’s “Effervescent Daddy”, a mid-tempo sexy blues track: ‘Effervescent Daddy, you’re my heart’s desire / When you talk, it’s intoxicating, when you walk it’s, like, syncopated.’

“Whip It To A Jelly” (G. Smith) is sexy, rockin’ blues. ‘There’s a new dance that can’t be beat / You move most everything except your feet / And whip it to a jelly, if you like good jelly roll.’ The remainder of the lyrics indicate that this dance ain’t for the young and innocent prom crowd.

Lady K loves Trudy Lynn’s Royal Oaks Blues Café, you will too.

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